What to Do After Receiving a Jury Summons in Los Angeles 



In Los Angeles, an individual is randomly selected from a pool of voters. The person isn’t considered an actual juror until they complete a long jury selection Los Angeles CA process. That process starts with a jury summons. The jury summons is mailed to an individual.

Prior to Appearing for Jury Duty the Person Should Contact Their Employer

It is important for a person who is summons as a jury to contact their employer to inform them about the summons. The person should also find out if they will be paid by their employer while serving on the jury. The county requires the person to complete juror orientation. Participating in online juror orientation isn’t mandatory. It will make reporting for jury on the first day easier because they won’t have to complete orientation that day.

Jury Selection in Los Angeles is Mandatory

Failure to show up for jury service on the first day is a fine. As of 2018, the fine is approximately $1,500. If the person is found qualified to serve on a jury, they must complete jury duty. This means the person will have to complete jury duty and pay a possible fine.

The number of days a person serves jury duty depends on whether they are selected to a jury panel. Being a juror requires a person to be ready to serve when they are called. Thus, they must telephone the court at the beginning of each weekend to find out if they’ve been selected to sit on a jury. This is required for five days. If the person isn’t required to report, their service is complete for one year. However, if they are required to serve on a jury, the average trial is five to seven days.

It is Possible to Reschedule Jury Service for a More Convenient Time

A person who wants to reschedule their jury service must first register with the court online or by telephone. The next step is to request a postponement. They must complete the Section A of their jury summons. An individual can postpone their jury service for up to 90 days.

The Juror May Sit on a Grand or Trial Jury

Although a person is selected as a potential juror, that doesn’t mean they will serve or know the jury panel. There are two juries a person can sit on: trial jury or grand jury. A trial jury hears a criminal or civil case where a prosecutor and defense attorney argue their cases. They must decide if the defendant or plaintiff will win. The plaintiff in a criminal case is the state.

The second type of jury is a grand jury. A grand jury is considered a secret jury. It only hears the state’s case. Defense attorneys aren’t allowed to present their case or cross-examine the state’s witnesses. The goal of a grand jury is to determine if there’s probable cause to charge a person with a crime.