4 Reasons for Using a Notary

For individuals looking to put their affairs in order, the cost of having a lawyer professional draw up paperwork might be too expensive. There are ways to ensure an official status for particular documents, and using a notary is one of them. Notaries are public service individual that has been authorized by the state government to witness signatures on documents and perform other acts dealing with legal affairs. The sign of official capacity is the individual’s notary seal embosser.

Common Types of Notarizations

There are a number of notarial acts that a person may request, though there are specifications on how a notary can perform his or her services. These are a few of the more common requests.

1. Acknowledgments

In this request, the notary is to ensure the person signing a document is who they say they are and they are exercising their free will in signing the document. Deeds, mortgages and other valuable assets are often notarized when transferring hands.

2. Affirmation/Oaths

There are instances where an individual may need an oath to be administered verbally, similar to what a signed statement equals in determining truthfulness. Affirmations are pledges of a person’s honor, while an oath is considered a solemn pledge to a higher authority.

3. Jurat

A notary may be called upon to assist the truthfulness of the contents of a document. The document does not have to be drafted in the presence of the notary, but the document is brought before the notary and signed in their presence. A verbal oath or affirmation must then be made by the signer to affirm the statements of the document as accurate and truthful.

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4. Copy Certification

When an original document has been reproduced, a notary may sign a copy certification authorizing the reproduction is a full, accurate transcription from the original. These could include driver’s license, medical records or bills of sale.

Notaries can help with authorizing a number of legal documents. However, they aren’t a substitute for legal counsel.